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This topic contains 17 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  yossarian 4 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #301

    kyougn
    Moderator

    A space to collect stuff that is supraconductorly related!

    for instance, this article/discussion with Arcadia Missa, Jennifer Chan, Ann Hirsch, Cadence Kinsey and Rozsa Farkas consider, among many other things: “What does it mean to situate performance online, and how does this not only change the terms of ‘performance’ as a category, but also work to shift the perception that there is a distinction between IRL and URL?” is posed. hmmm:

    http://www.metamute.org/editorial/articles/becoming-camwhore-becoming-pizza

    • This topic was modified 4 years, 6 months ago by  kyougn.
    #305

    kyougn
    Moderator

    i love this story.

    http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2012/11/01/Technical-glitch-mars-mayors-conference.html

    Columbus Mayor Michael B. Coleman’s third education briefing, held this afternoon, was to focus largely on new online technologies that could bring the most-skilled professors into classrooms via the Internet.

    But what the presentation made clear is that the technology isn’t without problems of its own. Meeting attendees couldn’t hear, talk to or view the remote presentation of online-education advocate Tom Vander Ark, who was to speak to the group from Seattle, Wash., on the benefits of using such technology.

    Eric Fingerhut, who is leading the briefings as an educational adviser to the city, noted the irony as technicians spent the first 10 minutes of the briefing scrambling around the room at Metro Early College High School near Ohio State University. A backup plan to get Vander Ark’s voice into the room on a telephone line also failed, and he was ultimately dropped from the presentation.

    “If you’re tweeting, you can note that the moderator of this is embarrassed,” Fingerhut said.

    Charter schools were the other theme of the briefing, with Bill Sims, executive director of the Ohio Charter Schools Association, giving an in-person presentation. About 7.3 percent of all Ohio public-school students attend a charter, but they are disproportionately urban students. That’s by design, Simms said: Charters can automatically locate in Ohio’s eight largest urban districts, but can set up shop in other districts only if that district rates a D or an F on their state report card.

    Ohio has the second-most students enrolled in on-line charters, Simms said. There was no discussion about how charter schools are performing: One in four in central Ohio rates a D or an F on its report card.

    Coleman asked Simms to submit a list of collaboration efforts nationwide between charters and school districts.

    The city launched the briefings after Coleman and City Council President Andrew J. Ginther announced in late September that they were volunteering their leadership to the Columbus City Schools, including plans to help choose a replacement for out-going Superintendent Gene Harris.

    Fingerhut said after the meeting that no inferences should be drawn from having a briefing on charters.

    “These briefings are not in any way designed to make recommendations,” Fingerhut said.

    The final briefing in two weeks is entitled Education and the Community. Coleman said that by the end of the year the effort would broaden into a “community process,” followed by recommendations.

    bbush@dispatch.com

    #306

    kyougn
    Moderator
    #310

    yossarian
    Participant

    Back in 2009 I found this and in response our band made this. It strikes me now that the ethos is remarkably reminiscent of the glitch art and supraconductivity ideas.

    #411

    kyougn
    Moderator
    #412

    kyougn
    Moderator

    @yossarian – thanks for your reference to crap art. i had not heard of it before. brings in the notion of TIME/liveness, which is relevant to the supraconductivity conversation but has yet to be spooled out on this (un)threading. curious to know more about how you went about making The Ears of William Prynne.

    #424

    therourke
    Participant

    A few links to promote Supraconductive thoughts:

    Loving the Ghost in the Machine: Aesthetics of Interruption
    - Essay collection: ‘The Art of the Accident
    - “Perfection Is Not A Useful Concept
    - Useless and Defunct Objects Should Be Called… ‘Thomassons

    I especially like the last link as a thought promoter,  even though it veers the furthest away from technology and transmission.

    What would a technical/network Thomasson ”look” like? How would we know it when we encountered it? When does a mistake based on a misunderstanding become an aesthetically/creatively interesting diversion?

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 6 months ago by  therourke.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 6 months ago by  therourke.
    #484

    yossarian
    Participant

    I guess a software Thomasson could be a control – a button, a checkbox, or whatever – that does nothing, or that does something pointless. There are loads of those out there, although I can’t think of a specific example right now. I could make one, but that begs the same question we’ve come up against before: if a glitch is deliberate, is it still a glitch?

    #485

    yossarian
    Participant

    We made The Ears Of William Prynne by following the Album-A-Day rules. We all met in Bishop’s Stortford (where Tim lived at the time), having prepared nothing, and spent the first few hours of the 24 at Tim’s house, writing songs. Then we drove to a recording studio in Ipswich and spent the rest of the 24 hours writing more, recording and mixing. One great thing about it was that it forced us to collaborate more on writing songs, because of the rule that two people are not supposed to work on different songs at the same time. Normally one of us writes a song on his own, then brings it to the band so that they can work out parts.

    #486

    yossarian
    Participant

    I didn’t realise that Facebook isn’t the most popular social network everywhere in the world. Curious.

    #487

    yossarian
    Participant

    And then there’s lo-fi music. My ex-idol John Darnielle of the Mountain Goats used to make it (although he rejected the label, perversely preferring the term bi-fi), and, in my obsessive attempts to emulate him, so did I. Check out the liner notes from the Mountain Goats’ 2001 album All Hail West Texas, and have a listen to what he’s talking about.

    If you listen carefully to my song Originality Is King, Kids, you can hear the washing machine going in the background, along with a good dose of tape hiss. During Nothing Came Out, by another great lo-fi band, the Moldy Peaches, the phone rings.

    I had my first album professionally manufactured on CD, with professionally printed digipack sleeves. When the box of them arrived, the first copy I picked out looked like this. That was scary for a moment, but fortunately the rest were ‘perfect’.

    All beautiful glitches.

    #488

    yossarian
    Participant

    I just thought: a very obvious Thomasson is the human appendix

    #490

    yossarian
    Participant

    I would also like to draw your attention to the original Yossarian. His genius was in pointing out the absurdity of the conventional; challenging ‘common sense’ and traditional thinking in a way that made it seem incredible that anybody (including our past selves) would defend it. For example, he showed so clearly that cowardice can be good that I can hardly believe I once bought into the unconditional glorification of bravery that I still cannot eradicate from my subconscious. It seems that we are trying to do something analogous: we’re trying to show that glitches can be good in a way that makes the almost ubiquitous glorification of ‘perfection’ seem ridiculous. Maybe we should take a leaf out of Yossarian’s book.

    #493

    yossarian
    Participant

    Have I been going too far off-topic?

    Oh well.

    My grandad died today. It made me think about death, surprisingly enough. Many people see death as a glitch, but biologically speaking it isn’t, in the sense of being a ‘mistake’. To use yet more metaphors, it’s a design feature – a ‘deliberate’ glitch, like the software Thomasson I could have made. Maybe the way out of that little labyrinth is to redefine the word ‘glitch’ to encompass deliberate as well as accidental mistakes, in addition to ‘good’ as well as ‘bad’ mistakes. No doubt I’m way behind and you guys have already had that thought. But if you remove all of those distinctions, what characteristics are left? Does ‘glitch’ become an empty concept? And does any of it matter?

    #658

    kyougn
    Moderator

    yossarian, i am very sorry that your grandad died.

    don’t know if any of it matters. in the face of death, doesn’t seem like it.

    in the face of life, i think maybe. hence the time and effort in hacking through this jungle. for me this rethinking glitch/mistake/failure and the like  is not just aesthetic exercise. it delves into the language and maneuverings of politics, socialization, agency, instrumentalization, relations aka people. at the same time, to be clear, i very much question the notion of aesthetics as case study of the social. it’s not so simple. a call for a distribution of the sensible seems to be inherently intertwined with a distribution of the senses.

    btw, don’t think you are far off the mark at all. or to be more precise, given what we’re working through, does that question even hold any weight? if questions of perfect/imperfect/almost perfect/middling and such are taken off the table, what replaces them?

    re death as a glitch aka the notion of death as a diagnosable disease. yes, i know this discourse to be alive and well in the medical field from my previous life as a researcher in the area of population aging. well-known for its creepy (and very costly) factor, industry of cryogenics, but also research on cell growth and causes/reversal of cell death which comes with other discoveries in the medical sciences. it may sound ludicrous to most. but at the same time, the 20th century saw the largest and fastest decreases in mortality rates and increases in life expectancy in first world societies–achievements that were inconceivable 10,20,50 years earlier.  as arrogant as “death as a disease” may sound, with exponential advances in longevity coupled with the oaths of hippocrates, one could also see it as the next step in the logic of western medicine. and even if it is not achievable, it is something to strive for, and the fallout of attempting to “cure death” can yield other medical advances in treating and curing various diseases. at any rate, it’s been a long time since i’ve thought about this. but very interesting and relevant to think about in this context of the glitch. so again, far from off the mark as you can get, i think.

    #659

    kyougn
    Moderator

    Supraconductor

    #804

    yossarian
    Participant

    What do you mean by “aesthetics as case study of the social” and “a call for a distribution of the sensible seems to be inherently intertwined with a distribution of the senses”?

    #923

    yossarian
    Participant

    Seriously, I would very much like to know what those phrases mean. It’s all part of my continuing education.

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