Notes re:distributing tools and dirtying environments (live cds/vms)

 

Home Forums DNMw3rkstati0n Notes re:distributing tools and dirtying environments (live cds/vms)

This topic contains 4 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Ben Baker-Smith Ben Baker-Smith 5 years ago.

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  • #251

    jake
    Moderator

    I’ve been thinking about how to distribute software tools and working environments in a workshop context, to avoid spending a lot of time installing software like Puredata and some of the more complex Python modules.

    In the past, I’ve done this by sharing artware/media-specific Linux Live CDs/USB disks. dyne:bolic and its offspring puredyne are both discontinued projects (dyne as of sept. 2011 and puredyne as of feb. 2012). I don’t think either was compatible with mac laptops from the last year or two at the point they ceased development.

    A better solution might be to make a USB-bootable distribution based on a stripped-down Ubuntu, with Puredata & Python2 & a bunch of dirtynewmedia-friendly modules installed, along with a bunch of sample code & patches. Remastersys would make this a pretty straightforward project.

    But another thing that bothers me about Live CDs is how they isolate themselves from a user’s day-to-day computer usage, setting up an art/life barrier that precludes practices like jonCates’s tumbl-remix-retumbl, and like jon.satrom’s prepared desktop. (I think? Obviously I don’t have direct insight into either practice, but they seem to me to draw from daily computer use and then quickly move samples, screenshots, etc. into artmaking/mediaworking software).

    The most appealing solution to me right now is a Virtualbox virtual machine snapshot. This would run inside a user’s existing OS, and require installing the Virtualbox tool in addition to the snapshot. Preparing the snapshot would be easier than making a Live CD — just spend some time installing the OS to the virtual machine, installing software and loading up documentation, examples, and other media, then save a snapshot.

    #279

    nickbriz
    Key Master

    “But another thing that bothers me about Live CDs is how they isolate themselves from a user’s day-to-day computer usage, setting up an art/life barrier that precludes practices “

    true, but (in my experience with LiveCDs) it does function as a quick intro to an alternative computer usage/experience, which only requires ‘em to dip their toes in the koolaide. Sometimes they dip in for a bit to experiment, and never go back (though forever have that context/awareness) other times they dive in a bit deeper (you can include an option on a Live CD to run an install Ubuntu wizard).

    …this is not to say that you should go Virtualbox, this also sounds like a great approach… desktop mashup, i.e. new/other potential for day-to-day computer usage practice informing :P

    #547
    missholloway
    missholloway
    Moderator

    @nick @jake

    i’ve already lost all my liveCDs i’ve ever made, some of them being 2nd or 3rd copies =[

    so if i'm allowed to have an opinion, i think i'm for the virtual box idea cus i can't loose that. forgive me if that sounds silly!!

    i suppose i just really feel jake when he says "Live CDs [....] isolate themselves from a user’s day-to-day computer usage, setting up an art/life barrier that precludes practices “

    #569

    i will give virtualbox a whirl.

    the livecd has been a-ok in past. i still have the one from nick’s workshop a couple of years ago. :)

    #622
    Ben Baker-Smith
    Ben Baker-Smith
    Participant

    I’ve never been able to get a bootable USB to work on Mac OS, so for the sake of compatibility Virtual Box seems like the easy route. I use it daily on a Mac at work and have no complaints, though I’m not sure how well it handles media playback (I only text edit and terminal).

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